• 200+Year Lifespan?

    Posted September 14, 2018: by Bill Sardi

    If What Has Been Demonstrated In The
    Animal Lab Can Be Achieved In Humans,
    Some Individuals May Live 200+ Years

    • Mankind is achieving small increases in “adult mortality reductions” that produce unprecedented longevity in modern day populations in developed countries.
    • An even greater (2.7-fold) increase in the human lifespan could possibly be achieved by making up for a genetic flaw in humans, the same genetic flaw that was recently overcome in the animal lab to produce extraordinary longevity.
    • Habitual vitamin C intake throughout the day with non-toxic oral doses that far exceed current recommendations by public health agencies could theoretically expand the human lifespan beyond belief. Currently only a few people currently adhere to such a vitamin regimen.

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  • Life and Death & Vitamin C

    Posted September 2, 2018: by Bill Sardi

    A growing body of evidence suggests paramedics skip the traditional aspirin tablet and start giving vitamin C pills to those who survive a sudden cardiac arrest.

    Every day in the U.S. over 1000 people experience a sudden cardiac arrest.   And another 1000 occur throughout Europe daily.  As researchers report from the Amsterdam in the Netherlands, only half of these patients arrive at the hospital alive.  And 50% of these survivors will still die or be severely disabled due to what is called post-cardiac arrest syndrome.

    There is no effective therapy to improve prognosis and death.

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  • Dietary Supplements Under Attack Again

    Posted August 25, 2018: by Bill Sardi

    Rebuttal to:

    The vitamin epidemic: what is the evidence for harm or value?
    Internal Medicine Journal August 7, 2018

     

    Here we go again.  Another physician says there “no case for vitamin supplementation in normal, healthy, non-pregnant or lactating adults who are received the recommended daily intake of nutrients.”

    Here is my comment on each one of his criticisms of dietary supplementation.

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  • How The Scientific Establishment Takes On Criticism

    Posted August 16, 2018: by Bill Sardi

    On April 22, 2017 I posted a pointed article at Knowledgeofhealth.com that branded negative news reports about dietary supplements as “fake news.”  Among other targets of my criticism was the American Council on Science & Health (ACSH).  A spokesperson for ACSH said the 1994 Dietary Supplement Health & Education Act of 1994 swept away “all regulations that vitamin, mineral and herbal supplements prove they are safe and effective prior to marketing.”  It took the ACSH 16 months to catch up to my rebuttal to news reports that were in circulation last year unfairly damning vitamin pills.

    On August 14, 2018 a spokesperson for the ACSH belatedly fired back, ridiculing this health journalist and resorting to ad hominem attacks, calling me a “conspiracy-loving screwball.”  He also published a photo that might confuse readers it is a personal photo of Bill Sardi that was originally posted at the website of a recording engineer who said the photo characterized an impersonator on Twitter (not Bill Sardi).  This is bizarre.

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  • Lessons About Salt and Health

    Posted August 13, 2018: by Bill Sardi

    The Idea Salt Is/Isn’t Bad For Your Health Depends On What Your Definition of Is Is.

    Do you find yourself reaching for the saltshaker and then deciding not to salt your food because scientific reports say not to?

    Join the confused.

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  • The Baking Soda Cure-All Redux

    Posted August 11, 2018: by Bill Sardi

    It tastes salty.  It is in your kitchen.  And it’s dirt cheap.  And it’s threatening Big Pharma?  What is it?

    Just tell your doctor: “Hold the steroid shots, anti-inflammatory drugs and pain relievers.  I’ll take a quarter teaspoon of baking soda straight up with water.” Could Big Pharma be brought to its knees by sodium bicarbonate pills?

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  • Is There An Alternative To The Over-Drugging Of American School Children?

    Posted August 9, 2018: by Bill Sardi

    The symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are well known.

    Symptoms of ADHD

    Behavioral: aggression, excitability, fidgeting, hyperactivity, impulsivity, irritability, lack of restraint, or persistent repetition of words or actions

    Cognitive: absent-mindedness, difficulty focusing, forgetfulness, problem paying attention, or short attention span

    Mood: anger, anxiety, boredom, excitement, or mood swings

    The fidgeting, forgetfulness and lack of attention have certainly been evident in my own son along with symptoms of dyslexia.

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  • DENTAL DOGMA: Did The Dental Profession Just Admit Toothbrushing And Flossing Are Ineffective?

    Posted : by Bill Sardi

    So the makers of non-fluoride toothpaste have so riled the dental profession that it was forced to make a statement.  The news headline said: “Toothpaste WITHOUT fluoride: Dentists urge people to stop ‘ridiculous’ trend as they warn ‘brushing alone is note enough’.”

    Uh, say again?  We’re wasting our time brushing our teeth with non-fluoride toothpaste if we want to prevent cavities?  (Toothbrushing has some obvious effect in reducing plaque and maybe even restoring whiteness.)

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  • Vitamin C Addresses The Cause Of The Severe Form Of Macular Degeneration, But Will It Ever Be Recommended?

    Posted August 5, 2018: by Bill Sardi

    It’s bad enough that the slowly progressive form of macular degeneration robs seniors of their central vision that hampers reading and TV viewing and forces the use of magnifiers.  Fortunately, side vision remains.  There is no effective treatment for this form of the disease that is commonly called dry macular degeneration (no swelling or hemorrhage).  But then the disease can turn worse as blood circulation to the back of the eye is impaired and the compensational growth of new blood vessels to provide oxygenated blood rapidly invade the visual center of the eye (macula) that can result in permanent legal blindness (worse than 20/200 vision).  This is commonly called wet macular degeneration.

    To put a halt to the invasive blood vessels (called neovascularization or angiogenesis) eye doctors inject chemicals that block the growth of the new blood vessels.  The medicine blocks growth factors from triggering the outcropping of these new blood vessels.  These needle injections are needed every 30 days or so and are quite effective.  However, about 15% of these cases fail to respond to the medicine and progress to legal blindness.

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  • Hospitals Are Making A Killing On Poorly Nourished Patients As Insolvency Of Medicare Part A Looms

    Posted July 8, 2018: by Bill Sardi

    It is intuitive that nutritional status at hospital admission predicts the outcome of treatment and length of stay.  Yet too many older patients are over-drugged and undernourished on the day of their admission to the hospital and not only experience more complications and hospital-acquired infections, but by conservative estimation spend an extra costly day or two in the hospital.

    If nutritional assessment and corrective therapy were to be instituted upon hospital admission and reduced hospital length of stay by just 1 day, it is estimated in this report that practice would save $73 billion to Medicare Part A.  That represents 24.5% of the $293 billion of Medicare funds spent on hospitalization (Part A).

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