• Wall Street Cures For Alzheimer’s Disease

    Posted November 15, 2012: by Bill Sardi

    I was reading a front-page Wall Street Journal report about a medical researcher who believes his company, TauRx Pharmaceuticals Ltd, has a remedy for Alzheimer’s disease.  It was a re-run of dated stories about TauRx’s 10-year venture to cure or even slow down the progression of this debilitating brain disease.

    God knows how much venture capital TauRX has chewed up in the last 10 years.  The company finally completed a small human study.  At a 50-milligram dose the tau drug, Rember, produced only modest results in its first small human trial.  A 100-mg dose had no positive effect.  Full data on these first human studies were not revealed because the TauRx says “it didn’t to protect the company’s commercial interest.”  That commercial interest might be that TauRx’s molecule is nothing more than methylene blue, a cheap anti-fungal agent used in fish tanks.  While TauRx warns that Rember is different from plain methylene blue, it is a very close molecular cousin that appears to have been altered for the purpose of patent protection rather than improved performance.

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  • Vitamin B1 and Alzheimer’s disease

    Posted September 24, 2012: by Bill Sardi

    Comment: without a proven cure for Alzheimer’s disease, clinicians should move vitamin B1 (thiamin) to their “A” list of potential remedies. Coffee, tea, alcohol, sugar, all block B1 absorption. Fat-soluble B1 (benfotiamine) was developed for this very purpose. Accompanying signs of B1 deficiency would be nystagmus (lateral eye twitches), chronic diarrhea, fibromyalgia-like symptoms, heart failure, greying of hair, diabetic complications in eyes and kidneys. — Bill Sardi, Knowledge of Health, Inc.

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  • Losing Your Mind: Is Modern Civilization To Blame?

    Posted March 8, 2010: by Bill Sardi

    It was November 3, 1906, at a medical meeting in Germany, when Dr. Alois Alzheimer first described a patient named “Augusta” who, at age 51, exhibited abnormal mental, language and behavior problems. Upon her death, the patient’s brain was autopsied and Dr. Alzheimer described a rare and “a peculiar disease of the cerebral cortex.” Accumulation of a form of plaque, now called beta amyloid, characterizes this disease. Today about half of the current 85-plus population exhibits these same tangled, shrunken tissues in their brain that Dr. Alzheimer first observed over 100 years ago.

    Epidemiologists, medical scientists who search for the causes of disease in human populations, have been perplexed for decades over the cause of Alzheimer’s disease — the early onset (40s and 50s) of memory-impairment due to abnormal changes in the brain, compared to senile dementia which occurs later in life.

    For heretofore unexplained reasons, Alzheimer’s disease is rare, even nonexistent, in some rural undeveloped lands like India and Africa. Alzheimer’s disease appears to be a disease of modern civilization. This suggests an environmental rather than an inherited origin.

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